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Comics Take a Candid Look at Refugee Lives

With the refugee crisis in Lebanon grinding on into its seventh year, Solidarités International—a French nongovernmental organization whose main work is providing safe water, hygiene and sanitation systems to settlements of displaced Syrians—found that it needed a new way to tell its story.

As “donor fatigue” set in, the organization saw that the usual forms of aid-agency public relations—press releases, documentary photography or videos—were not enough.

Australia Grants AU$30 million to UNICEF to Strengthen Access to Education for Vulnerable Children in Lebanon Over the Next Three Years

The Government of Australia announced a $30 million (AUD) contribution to UNICEF over the next three years to increase access to quality education in public schools and strengthen the Lebanese education system through its support to Lebanon’s ‘Reaching All Children with Education’ (RACE II) strategy.

Refugee Code Week Educates 15,000 in Second Outing

Jordanian minister of information and communication technology Majd Shweikeh has announced the successful conclusion of Refugee Code Week 2017.

The program integrates coding into educational curricula, referring promising participants to the ReBootKamp in Jordan for job placements.

The event saw more than 15,000 Syrian refugees and Jordanian youths learn coding skills, training 5,000 more people than in 2016. Read more

Universities Urged to Offer Refugees Scholarships to Help Them Rebuild War-Torn Countries

Universities around the world are being urged to offer more scholarships to refugees.

At the Australian International Higher Education Conference in Hobart, attendees from more than 30 countries heard only 1 per cent of the world's 65 million refugees had a university degree.

Portuguese diplomat Helena Barroco said there was an urgent need to provide more refugees with educational opportunities. Read more.

Online Study Scheme Gives Refugee Students a Degree of Hope

War brought an abrupt end to Qusai’s efforts to become a lawyer. He had been in the first year of a law degree course at university in Dara’a when violence broke out in the southern Syrian city at the start of the country’s civil conflict in 2011.

In 2013, he and his family fled to Jordan and ended up in the remote refugee camp of Azraq. There, Qusai’s hopes of continuing his education seemed to evaporate.