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Higher Education for Refugees

Today the world is facing the largest migrant crisis in human history: More than 65 million people—nearly one percent of the world’s population—are displaced as a result of conflict. While the demands of survival have taken priority, the large and unaddressed educational needs of this population are astounding: The United Nations estimates that there are at least 200,000 Syrians who have had their post-secondary education interrupted as a result of the conflict. Read more.

This nonprofit connects Syrian refugees to American students for language lessons via Skype

In 2013, while studying at Carleton College in Minnesota, Bailey Ulbricht spent two months on the Turkish/Syrian border. There she met Syrian refugees who wanted to return to school but couldn’t — Turkish universities required English language skills that many lacked. Ulbricht figured she could help, at least in the case of a few friends. Read more.

Barnard Responds to Syrian Crisis Through Creation of the Ann and Andrew Tisch Scholarship for Refugee Women

“Like millions of people,” says Ann Tisch, “we witness the horror of what’s going on in Syria and other nations around the globe. By sponsoring and funding this scholarship, we can make a contribution. We hope that the Barnard scholarship will become a copycat initiative, with other colleges inspired to follow this example.” Read more.

Plea to universities to alleviate Syria’s brain drain

The Institute of International Education wants every one of the 15,000 universities around the world to offer a tuition-free place to one Syrian student and rescue one Syrian academic displaced by the civil war. IIE president Allan Goodman made the call to help alleviate the brain drain of people needed to rebuild Syria once the conflict is over at the International Higher Education Forum organised by Universities UK in London this week. Read more.
 

Meet the Syrians using education to escape the refugee camps

“We are the lucky ones. Most had to give up their dreams of higher education” says 19-year-old Reema Nasser Al Hamad, whose family fled to Jordan five years ago when bombs destroyed her home in Dara’a, Syria. She shudders to think of the alternatives: aimless days spent sitting in a crowded caravan, or early marriage. “After the war, students in Syria lost their cities, their opportunities, and their futures, so many of the girls just married when they got here.